History of the Mansion

mainThe historic McCune Mansion in Salt Lake City, Utah provides an elegant and impressive setting for any social occasion or business event. The handsome and hospitable Mansion, with its state-of-the-art amenities and superior staff, is the ultimate in fine taste and gracious surrounding. The Mansion's world-class period architecture, workmanship, and design make it an important part of Utah's heritage at the same time that it ranks among the grandest of early 20th century homes in all America.

The building of the McCune Mansion began in 1898 and was completed at a cost of $1,000,000.00 in 1901. The McCarthey Family purchased the Mansion in 1999 and generously returned the mansion to its original architectural splendor and exemplary workmanship while faithfully preserving its historical legacy and community prominence.

Today the McCune Mansion offers a stunning and welcoming setting for weddings, anniversaries, celebrations, board meetings, retreats and other important occasions.

Early American entrepreneur and railroad tycoon Alfred W. McCune built the Mansion as his family home. Elizabeth McCune, Alfred's wife, chose the prominent architect S.C. Dallas to design the home with the finest in furnishings, objects d'art and materials available in the United States and abroad.

When the McCune Family decided to move to Los Angeles in 1920, they donated the Mansion to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which, in turn, used it to establish the McCune School of Music.

Noteworthy interior details, shipped from around the world, include rare materials, such as Utah onyx, Nubian and Irish marble, French tapestries, South American mahogany, Russian leather, and German mirrors. The exterior was built of native Utah sandstone and the roof, covered with tiles made in the Netherlands.

Exotic woods like bird's-eye maple, South American blond mahogany and 400-year-old English oak radiate warmth and beauty throughout.

Guests admire the gold leaf hand gilding, the exquisite murals, decorative scagliola and the detailed artwork echoing century-old brushstrokes. Today original Russian impressionist paintings accent the decor, while the glow from fireplaces and antique fixtures blends with the warmth of the magnificently carved wood to create a most gracious environment.

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